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FiMT funds study to better understand the employment barriers faced by the ex-Service community and small and medium size enterprises

Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has awarded funds of £87,140 to Good People to conduct a six-month study and feasibility assessment of an innovative new pilot aimed at improving employment outcomes for ex-Service personnel and their partners.

The project is  focussed in the Solent area, working with veterans, employers and civil society to understand the employment challenges faced by the veteran community as well as small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) seeking access to this resource pool, and to develop a new model for veteran employment.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive, Forces in Mind Trust, said: “Forces in Mind Trust has funded this research to address two key issues in the employment of ex-Service personnel.  Firstly, current recruitment methods are largely focused on CVs and job titles rather than skills and core competencies. This can be an obstacle for ex-Service personnel when seeking employment where there is a lack of understanding about transferable skills.  Secondly, smaller business, such as SMEs and Start-Ups, are often unable to engage in veteran recruitment and transition services, which have largely been focused toward large employers.

By identifying and understanding the twin challenges of engaging smaller businesses and skills-translation, the research will provide new insight into, and potential solutions for, the challenges faced by ex-Service personnel and their partners in employment.”

Richard Tyrie, Chief Executive of GoodPeople, said: “We are pleased to be supported by FiMT to explore the barriers faced by veterans and their families in navigating the rapidly changing jobs market. The transferable skills that veterans offer can be invaluable to employers big and small but knowing how military skills translate into a civilian environment can be a challenge for both employers and veterans alike. Understanding these challenges and the opportunities to overcome them is the first step towards a better working future for veterans.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact James Gillies at james@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952 or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust
About the Mental Health Research Programme: www.fim-trust.org/mental-health/research-programme/

Forces in Mind Trust publishes evaluation of Armed Forces Covenant training programme for local authorities across Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire

Today (7th November 2019), Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has published an evaluation report on the Charnwood, Melton and Rushcliffe (CMR) Borough Councils Partnership, which examines the development and delivery of an Armed Forces Covenant training programme for local authority staff across Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire.

Bringing the Armed Forces Covenant to Life was a one-day training event funded by FiMT. It was designed to build awareness of the Covenant across the two counties and was attended by staff from 13 local authorities and two universities.

In the months following the event, attendees reported increased levels of confidence and knowledge in how they can support their Armed Forces communities. They also noted improvements in their action plans and policies, better awareness of training for front-line staff, increased knowledge of the needs of the Armed Forces community and new partnerships with local organisations.

The training programme was a result of an announcement by the Minister for Housing and Homelessness and the Minister for Defence People and Veterans, which encouraged local authorities to consider how they could ensure that Covenant initiatives remained current and continued to support the Armed Forces community. This, coupled with available funding from FiMT, enabled the CMR Partnership to employ a Covenant expert to deliver the training programme and carry out a consultation exercise across the counties.

The evaluation follows the journey of the local authorities as they build a better awareness of the Covenant in their organisations and the CMR Partnership in designing and delivering the programme, exploring what it means in practice, and how local authorities can continue to best support their Armed Forces Communities.

The full report is available here.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT says:

“This evaluation shows that by collaborating, and with relatively little funding, local authorities can develop and share good practice to improve delivery of their commitments under the Armed Forces Covenant. In just a matter of months, local authorities across Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire have built partnerships, renewed their commitments under the Covenant and understood how the principles can be embedded into their organisations. This isn’t complicated, but it does require commitment, and I’d encourage all local authorities to read the report and implement the lessons that will help improve the support they give to their own Armed Forces Communities.”

Julie Robinson, project lead for the Charnwood, Melton and Rushcliffe Armed Forces Covenant Partnership, says:

 “We are very proud of the Charnwood, Melton and Rushcliffe partnership and through its work we have helped a number of organisations become more aware of issues relating to Armed Forces personnel and how they can support them.”

“We were delighted to share this learning with colleagues from other organisations and we are sure it will help them deliver better services to support serving and former Armed Forces personnel.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact James Gillies at james@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952 or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org

Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports

Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped

Twitter: @FiMTrust

Responding to the MOD’s announcement of increased support for Service Leavers Air Vice-Marshal Ray Lock CBE, Chief Executive at Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), says:

“The creation of the Defence Transition Service is a welcome step in the right direction. The enhanced support it offers the most vulnerable will have a big impact; but as a modest resource, it has to be targeted at those who need it most to be effective. The majority of people who leave the Armed Forces make a smooth transition to civilian life. But some do struggle, and they must be given the right support when they first need it.

“There is already much excellent work being done to support ex-Service personnel as they rejoin civilian life. The new Defence Transition Service will need to integrate with existing services provided by the public and charitable sectors. Service leavers, and in particular the most vulnerable, need to be identified early and signposted to the most appropriate services available.

“The 2016 FiMT-funded Stoll outreach programme in London demonstrated how those facing particular difficulties during transition, such as housing, employment and health issues, can be targeted to ensure they receive the best support possible (Report here). We are pleased to see that the Government is now developing a more holistic approach to the support that the Defence Transition Service promises to provide.”

“The Forces in Mind Trust has been promoting a holistic approach to transition since 2013 when it published its TMS Report, highlighting that ‘the whole family is transitioning, not just the Service leaver.”

“The MOD is stepping up its support for veterans’ transition to civilian life. The acid test though will be whether the Defence Holistic Transition Policy published today translates into practice, particularly on such key areas as the translation of military skills into the workplace, overcoming misperceptions of veterans, and sharing data”.

A statement from Chief Executive, Ray Lock, Forces in Mind Trust

In response to yesterday’s news regarding reserves held by Armed Forces charities, Ray Lock, Chief Executive at Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) states:

“To accuse Armed Forces charities of ‘hoarding’ cash is to ignore the context within which these (and many other) charities are operating, and the challenges of ensuring they successfully meet the needs of their 6 million potential beneficiaries, whilst also being sustainable both now and in the future.

“Charities’ free reserves represent just a few months of future running costs. Forces in Mind Trust’s research carried out in partnership with DSC (Directory of Social Change) shows that between 2012 and 2017, large Armed Forces charities typically held less than a year and a half’s expenditure in reserves and that small charities are less able to build reserves (Armed Forces Charities – Sector Trends 2019 Report).  This picture is further complicated by the balance between restricted and unrestricted funds.

“With an ever-increasing cost of meeting the needs of the changing demographic, reductions in public services, and pressures on fund raising across the sector, our research suggests that reserves in the Armed Forces charities sector are at an appropriate level for the current circumstances. We also know that individual charity boards look regularly and closely at their position.

“We expect to report again at the beginning of 2020 with an updated version of our independent and ground-breaking 2014 ‘Sector Insight’ report.”

ENDS

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust

Policy Statement on Employment

This Statement sets out FiMT’s policy position on the employment of ex-Service personnel and their families. It provides an overview of the evidence that exists to support it, the issues that inform it, and the changes that are needed to achieve it.

Click here to download FiMT’s Policy Statement on Employment.

VETERANS FACE NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES WHEN APPLYING FOR JOBS

Nearly one fifth (18%) of UK organizations surveyed are unlikely to consider hiring veterans due to negative perceptions of their time spent in the Armed Forces.

Veterans, or those who have served in the Armed Forces, face negative stereotypes when applying for jobs, according to a survey released today (8th October) by the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT). The new YouGov survey reveals nearly one fifth (18%) of UK senior decision makers with hiring responsibilities are unlikely to consider hiring veterans, mostly due to negative perceptions of their time spent in the Armed Forces.

Of the negative perceptions held by potential employers, the most common is that veterans do not have the relevant skills or experience (44%). This is followed by a belief that they may not fit the culture of the workplace (19%); skills from active duty may not translate into a business environment (18%); or they may have different levels of education from those expected of civilian workers (11%).

Over a quarter of the organisations polled in the research (27%) have never hired a veteran and 10% of organisations don’t believe taking advantage of the skillsets of veterans would bring value to their organisation. However, nearly two-thirds (63%) of employers polled in the survey believe hiring veterans helps contribute to the diversity of their organization. The smaller organizations polled in the survey ranked as the least likely to consider hiring a veteran (65%) whilst the larger organizations ranked as most likely (87%).

The Veteran Employment research was commissioned by FiMT, whose mission is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families to make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life. Over 1,000 senior decision makers were polled in the research, including private, public and third sector organizations of all sizes.

The research is part of FiMT’s core Employment Programme which aims to ensure that no ex-Service person, or their spouse or partner, is disadvantaged in achieving a successful employment outcome. The FiMT Employment Programme is focused on bringing about change in two areas:

• Ex-Service personnel having the right skills and understanding, receiving the right support and preparing appropriately.

• Employers understanding the skills and potential of Service leavers, and being able to access and harness the veteran workforce.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT says:

“The fact that many organizations would not consider hiring veterans due to negative perceptions of their time spent serving in the Armed Forces, highlights the misunderstanding that veterans are unskilled or unfit for business environments. Such misunderstandings are unfounded and damaging to veterans’ employment opportunities. Employers must ensure these unhelpful perceptions are addressed in their recruitment processes, so that they benefit from the skills that veterans can bring to their organization.”

“Veterans gain strong leadership, communications, management and STEM skills from their time spent serving in the Armed Forces. As the UK currently faces a STEM skills shortage, and the evolving world of work cries out for better leadership and collaboration, employers would do well to tap into veterans’ talent to the benefit of both veterans and UK organizations.”

“Our research demonstrates that Government must strengthen its strategy for translating and accrediting skills, experience and qualifications gained in the Armed Forces for the civilian world. We need to increase awareness and understanding among civilian employers of how Service leavers’ skills fit their recruitment needs. Together these will help the annual 14,000 Service leavers to find fulfilling employment, and the many UK businesses to improve their performance.”

Andrew Armes, UK Head of Talent Acquisition, Roche Products Ltd says:

“At Roche we believe that inclusivity is the key to our business success as it underpins innovation. Veterans have valuable skills that will help us with our future business needs and transformation as a business. By tackling any negative perceptions and attitudinal issues we can learn a lot. We are delighted to be partnering with Forces in Mind Trust to help address stereotypes and help unlock potential.”

During the first month of the Employment Programme, FiMT is partnering with Roche, the multinational healthcare company, to host a conference on 8th October challenging employers’ negative stereotypes of veterans. Following this, FiMT will host an event for senior politicians and business leaders to galvanise action.

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact James Gillies at james@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952 or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust
About the Mental Health Research Programme: www.fim-trust.org/mental-health/research-programme/

About the research:

All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 1282 adults who are senior decision makers with responsibility in HR in UK businesses. Fieldwork was undertaken between 5th – 18th September 2019. The survey was carried out online.

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Implementation of pilot mental fitness initiative to be evaluated

The implementation of a pilot mental fitness initiative, named HeadFIT, is to be evaluated over 12-months by King’s College London thanks to a grant of £92,757 awarded by the Forces in Mind Trust.

The initiative has been developed collaboratively by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and the Royal Foundation to promote awareness and management of good mental fitness within the Armed Forces Community and to prevent the onset of poor mental health.

The mental fitness initiative will be delivered via the mental health and well-being approach for Defence people and incorporated into annual and key career leadership training, supported by a video led campaign and website with self-help tools to aid in the understanding and awareness of mental fitness, and help personnel to maximise their potential.

The evaluation will consist of a series of questionnaires, interviews and focus groups with Defence people as well as with key stakeholders, to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the different elements of the initiative for military and Defence personnel. Results will be analysed to identify potential improvements to both the initiative and its implementation, prior to the full-scale roll-out across the Armed Forces.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive, Forces in Mind Trust, said: “The initiative developed by the MOD and The Royal Foundation is a progressive step in supporting the mental health of our Armed Forces. The evaluation of HeadFIT, funded by FiMT, will enable us to better understand what works in practice to support the mental well-being of our Service personnel during, and in the transition out of, service.”

Dr Sharon Stevelink, Lead Researcher, King’s College London, said: “We are looking forward to working with the MOD and The Royal Foundation to ensure that this initiative is independently evaluated. The aim of our evaluation is to help to improve the programme and ensure the initiative reaches its full potential. The study builds on our previous work evaluating health and well-being interventions in the Armed Forces and other trauma-exposed organisations. We are excited to be able to continue to help improve the mental fitness and readiness of military personnel throughout their military careers and beyond.”

Representative MOD, said: “The MOD has undertaken a comprehensive overhaul in our approach to mental health, beginning at the outset through promoting positive mental health and well-being, providing leadership support and reassurance regarding the effective treatment available.

We cannot do this alone, working with our partners outside of Defence is critical to getting this right. The importance of collaboration and partnerships with organisations such as FiMT, the Royal Foundation and King’s College London remain key to continuing our sustained focus on mental health and well-being ensuring that Life in the Services remains a rich and rewarding experience.”

David Wiseman, The Royal Foundation, Head of Programmes: Supporting Those Who Serve, said:

“This is an important programme; a legacy from the Heads Together Campaign that we hope will change the way Defence People think about mental health.  The focus of this work is the good management of good mental fitness – what should everyone be doing every day to proactively look after themselves and to unlock their potential instead of considering our mental health only when there is a problem.

The evaluation conducted by King’s College London will provide information that will enhance this work, and everyone is grateful that the Forces in Mind Trust are able to support this research.”

-Ends-

About King’s College London

King’s College London is one of the top 25 universities in the world (2017/18 QS World University Rankings) and among the oldest in England. King’s has more than 26,500 students (of whom nearly 10,400 are graduate students) from some 150 countries worldwide, and nearly 6,900 staff. The university is in the second phase of a £1 billion redevelopment programme which is transforming its estate. http://www.kcl.ac.uk

About Forces in Mind Trust
FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families to make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life. FiMT delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery, and by strengthening the Armed Forces charities sector through collaboration and leadership, and by building its capacity.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better-informed decisions can be made.

Useful links
Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust

Request for expressions of interest

Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has issued a request for expressions of interest (REOI) to conduct research into the longer-term employment outcomes for ex-Service personnel.

The FiMT award is expected to be in the region of £200,000. Although there is no specific completion date, the Trust would like to see the report completed and published within 18 months of commencement.

The commission was a result of consultation with stakeholders which identified a lack of evidence on the longer-term employment outcomes for ex-Service personnel after the initial transition from the Armed Forces and whether these outcomes could be attributed to a person’s time in service or the support received during transition.

For more details and how to submit an expression of interest see the full REOI.

FEMALE VETERANS FACE MORE BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT THAN MALE VETERANS

New report calls for advice services to support women during transition to civilian employment.

According to a new report published today (25 September 2019), female veterans face a ‘double whammy’ of challenges when it comes to transitioning into employment once they have left the Armed Forces – those that are experienced by Service leavers in general, as well as those faced specifically by women.

The research carried out by Cranfield University and the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) examines the employment outcomes and experiences of female Service leavers as they transition into civilian paid employment. The report, commissioned by Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), looks at the reasons why women have a lower employment rate (69%) compared to men (81%), after leaving the Armed Forces*

The research, which included a review of existing data, interviews and a survey with stakeholders, employers and female Service leavers themselves, reveals:

  • Most women leave the Armed Forces voluntarily, most commonly for reasons related to work-life balance, job satisfaction, lack of opportunities, and family responsibilities.
  • One in four (22%) of the 154 women surveyed in the research were not employed, but the majority (68%) of those women wanted to be in work.
  • Employers want to recruit Service leavers with benefits perceived to include work ethic, motivation, resilience and loyalty.
  • However, Service leavers in general have difficulty translating their military skills and experience into the civilian world, with some employers also believing they lack commercial and market experience and find it hard to adjust to less structured environments.
  • Female Service leavers and employers interviewed in the report said that women, unlike their male counterparts, undervalue their experience and may deselect themselves from roles they are suitable for.

The report also includes recommendations for the Ministry of Defence and employers, and calls on the MOD to:

  • Provide increased flexibility in working practices and childcare.
  • Provide support and advice for women leaving the Armed Forces, including how to find employment that allows flexible working and in sectors not traditionally seen as avenues for Service leavers.
  • Promote the benefits of employing female Service leavers and supporting employers to do so.

Katie Watson served in the British Armed Forces for 10 years including tours in Bosnia and Northern Ireland, before leaving and entering employment as an NHS hospital chaplain in Newcastle. She says:

“I think that one of the toughest things for employers is understanding what women actually do in the Army and the skills we bring to our place of work. There is a misunderstanding that because we may not have all engaged in combat, we weren’t on the front line, playing a vital role in operations. We veterans are a unique breed. We’ve got a ton of assets but also have our idiosyncrasies. By listening to veterans within their organisations employers can better understand the brilliant skills and ethos we bring from the Armed Forces”.

Professor Emma Parry, the lead researcher at Cranfield University, says:

“Female Service leavers face a double whammy of obstacles when it comes to transitioning into civilian employment. Only a minority of the women we spoke to felt that they received enough support during transition, and some said that the support they did get was not properly tailored to their needs. We hope this study inspires a collective effort to improve their transition to civilian employment.”

Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT says:

“We know that female Service leavers face specific challenges when seeking employment. This report makes it clear where collaborative efforts between the Government and employers should be focused to overcome these challenges. More clarity on the transferability of military skills and the use of workplace mentoring are improvements which can be readily made. Bringing these recommendations to the attention of employers is no easy matter, but Forces in Mind Trust looks forward to working closely with the MOD and employers to achieve this aim”.

For more information about the research and a full copy of the report please visit https://www.fim-trust.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/20190920-Female-Service-Leavers-and-Employment-FINAL.pdf.

ENDS –

NOTES TO EDITORS:

For more information or to interview Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT, please contact James Gillies, james@amazonpr.co.uk or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

Cranfield University media relations: Kath Middleditch, 01234 754594 / mediarelations@cranfield.ac.uk

About the research:

The research was carried out between January 2018 and February 2019 and had six stages: a review of existing evidence; analysis of secondary data; interviews with key stakeholders; a survey of female SLs (FSLs); interviews with FSLs; and interviews with actual and potential employers of FSLs.

*https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/676627/20180123_CTP_Bulletin_1516_REVISED_-_O.pdf

About Cranfield University:

Cranfield has been a world leader in management education and research for over 50 years, helping individuals and organisations learn and succeed by transforming knowledge into action. We are dedicated to creating responsible management thinking, improving business performance and inspiring the next generation of business leaders. We work to change the lives of our students and executives by encouraging innovation and creative thinking, as well as the drive to succeed and make a real impact on their organisations.

Organisations as diverse as Jaguar Land Rover, BAE Systems, Royal Dutch Shell, L’Oréal, UNICEF and the African Development Bank have benefited from our work, which ranges from management research projects, through staff talent management development on our MBA courses, to customised executive programmes.

Cranfield is one of an elite group of Schools worldwide to hold the triple accreditation of: AACSB International (the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), EQUIS (European Quality Improvement System) and AMBA (the Association of MBAs).

In the Times Higher Education/Wall Street Journal World University Rankings 2019, our Finance and Management MSc is ranked second in the UK, fourth in Europe and sixth in the world.

Our open and customised executive education programmes are ranked in the top ten in the UK, according to the latest Financial Times survey, and in the top ten in the world for international reach.

Over 8,000 people come to Cranfield each year to benefit from our executive and professional development programmes.Cranfield School of Management was the first business school in the UK to launch an Executive MBA via the newly created Apprenticeship Levy, run in partnership with Grant Thornton.

About the Institute for Employment Studies:

The Institute for Employment Studies (IES) is a leading independent, not-for-profit centre for research and evidence-based consultancy on employment, the labour market and HR policy and practice.

IES tweets from @EmploymtStudies

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.
The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.
FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better-informed decisions can be made.

Useful links
Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust

GDPR

We work for charities, public bodies and health brands. We have obtained your contact details from Cision media database and use this information, as well as any other information you give us, in accordance with our Privacy Policy. We are contacting you today about our client, Forces in Mind Trust. If you do not wish to be contacted by us, please let us know by replying to this email and we will delete your details from our records.