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Forces in Mind Trust awards funds for the trial of an alcohol reduction app

Forces in Mind Trust has awarded a grant of £310,144 to the King’s Centre for Military Health Research at King’s College London to conduct a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a veteran-specific smartphone app to assess its effectiveness in helping ex-Service personnel to reduce their alcohol consumption.

The app was developed by researchers at King’s in collaboration with the University of Liverpool to enable self-monitoring and management of alcohol consumption in ex-Service personnel who drink at hazardous or harmful levels. Distinguishing it from similar products, this app was co-designed with ex-Service personnel and uses military terminology, language and content. It also offers feedback and generates tailored text messaging. The app adapts to users’ needs with a novel personalisation framework which focuses on short-term consequences such as impact on fitness, mood, relationships and finances which helps motivate ex-Service personnel to reduce their alcohol consumption.

This RCT will be the first time an app aimed at UK ex-Service personnel has been academically tested.  A focus group of 10 ex-Service personnel will be recruited to review and refine the app as part of a co-design process and 600 participants will take part in the trial. Using data from the app, the research team will assess the effectiveness of the app in reducing alcohol consumption in a real-world setting and the impact on participants’ quality of life. The research team will also conduct a literature review to evaluate the benefits of using digital technology in the management and treatment of alcohol misuse.

Dr Daniel Leightley, project lead, King’s Centre for Military Health Research, King’s College London, said: “We are delighted to be working with Forces in Mind Trust and Combat Stress to trial our app with ex-Service personnel. Our study not only aims to understand if our app is helpful in reducing the amount ex-Service personnel drink, but also aims to improve understanding on how digital technology can be used to support Service charities and the Armed Forces Community.”

Dr Dominic Murphy, project lead, Combat Stress, said: “This is an exciting project that aims to support ex-Service personnel with alcohol difficulties by testing the use of an app-based treatment package that will allow individuals to access support digitally 24 hours a day at a time and location that suits them.”

Dr Laura Goodwin, project lead, Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool, said: “We know that ex-Service personnel with mental health problems are more likely to require support for alcohol misuse, but this support is often difficult to obtain. We are pleased to be able to trial this mobile app with ex-Service personnel using Combat Stress to understand whether it can help them reduce their drinking”

Ray Lock, Chief Executive, Forces in Mind Trust, said: “Previous research has shown that more than 50% of ex-Service personnel meet the criteria for hazardous alcohol use and, while there is a range of treatment pathways available for alcohol misuse, not all ex-Service personnel are able, or want, to access support services. Digital interventions such as this can provide a novel alternative to conventional help seeking and have been shown to be as effective as face-to-interventions at a lower cost to society. The app has the potential to catalyse real change and this RCT will help us to understand whether it can be used as an effective treatment tool in lowering harmful alcohol use in the Armed Forces Community.”

-Ends-

Notes to editors:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact Edward Haynes at edward@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952

Daniel Leightley is available for interview. To arrange please contact Robin Bisson, Senior Press Officer, King’s College London on +44 20 7848 5377/+44 7718 697176 / robin.bisson@kcl.ac.uk.

About King’s College London

King’s College London is one of the top 10 UK universities in the world (QS World University Rankings, 2018/19) and is among the oldest universities in England. King’s has an outstanding reputation for world-class teaching and cutting-edge research.  Since our foundation, King’s students and staff have dedicated themselves in the service of society. King’s will continue to focus on world-leading education, research and service, and will have an increasingly proactive role to play in a more interconnected, complex world.

www.kcl.ac.uk

About Forces in Mind Trust
FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families to make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life. FiMT delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery, and by strengthening the Armed Forces charities sector through collaboration and leadership, and by building its capacity.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better-informed decisions can be made.

Useful links
Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust

In response to today’s election pledges by the Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat parties Air Vice-Marshal Ray Lock CBE, Chief Executive at Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), says:

“We welcome policies that support members of our armed forces as they move into civilian life and urge all parties to prioritise help for those who need it most.

“Moving to civilian employment is generally considered to be one of the indicators of a successful transition from military to civilian life. We know, from our research, that nearly one fifth (18%) of UK organisations are unlikely to consider hiring veterans because they hold negative perceptions about their time spent serving. Veterans face significant challenges which can only be tackled if we all work together – government, charities, the public sector and businesses. The Office for Veterans’ Affairs must take the lead on this issue and we hope to see the next government reflect this in the Strategy for our Veterans.

“Parties must also pledge to grow and develop the Armed Forces Covenant. Our research indicates wide variations in the quality of social and healthcare services delivered. The Covenant must be further boosted through greater engagement with businesses and better awareness across all parts of government.

“In addition, the recent creation of the Defence Transition Services is a welcome step forward, offering enhanced support to the most vulnerable among our veterans. But as a modest resource, it will only work if it is properly targeted at those who need it most.

“We look forward to working with the next government to ensure that every person who has served our country makes a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life.”

FiMT funds study to better understand the employment barriers faced by the ex-Service community and small and medium size enterprises

Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has awarded funds of £87,140 to Good People to conduct a six-month study and feasibility assessment of an innovative new pilot aimed at improving employment outcomes for ex-Service personnel and their partners.

The project is  focussed in the Solent area, working with veterans, employers and civil society to understand the employment challenges faced by the veteran community as well as small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) seeking access to this resource pool, and to develop a new model for veteran employment.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive, Forces in Mind Trust, said: “Forces in Mind Trust has funded this research to address two key issues in the employment of ex-Service personnel.  Firstly, current recruitment methods are largely focused on CVs and job titles rather than skills and core competencies. This can be an obstacle for ex-Service personnel when seeking employment where there is a lack of understanding about transferable skills.  Secondly, smaller business, such as SMEs and Start-Ups, are often unable to engage in veteran recruitment and transition services, which have largely been focused toward large employers.

By identifying and understanding the twin challenges of engaging smaller businesses and skills-translation, the research will provide new insight into, and potential solutions for, the challenges faced by ex-Service personnel and their partners in employment.”

Richard Tyrie, Chief Executive of GoodPeople, said: “We are pleased to be supported by FiMT to explore the barriers faced by veterans and their families in navigating the rapidly changing jobs market. The transferable skills that veterans offer can be invaluable to employers big and small but knowing how military skills translate into a civilian environment can be a challenge for both employers and veterans alike. Understanding these challenges and the opportunities to overcome them is the first step towards a better working future for veterans.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact James Gillies at james@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952 or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust
About the Mental Health Research Programme: www.fim-trust.org/mental-health/research-programme/

Forces in Mind Trust publishes evaluation of Armed Forces Covenant training programme for local authorities across Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire

Today (7th November 2019), Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has published an evaluation report on the Charnwood, Melton and Rushcliffe (CMR) Borough Councils Partnership, which examines the development and delivery of an Armed Forces Covenant training programme for local authority staff across Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire.

Bringing the Armed Forces Covenant to Life was a one-day training event funded by FiMT. It was designed to build awareness of the Covenant across the two counties and was attended by staff from 13 local authorities and two universities.

In the months following the event, attendees reported increased levels of confidence and knowledge in how they can support their Armed Forces communities. They also noted improvements in their action plans and policies, better awareness of training for front-line staff, increased knowledge of the needs of the Armed Forces community and new partnerships with local organisations.

The training programme was a result of an announcement by the Minister for Housing and Homelessness and the Minister for Defence People and Veterans, which encouraged local authorities to consider how they could ensure that Covenant initiatives remained current and continued to support the Armed Forces community. This, coupled with available funding from FiMT, enabled the CMR Partnership to employ a Covenant expert to deliver the training programme and carry out a consultation exercise across the counties.

The evaluation follows the journey of the local authorities as they build a better awareness of the Covenant in their organisations and the CMR Partnership in designing and delivering the programme, exploring what it means in practice, and how local authorities can continue to best support their Armed Forces Communities.

The full report is available here.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT says:

“This evaluation shows that by collaborating, and with relatively little funding, local authorities can develop and share good practice to improve delivery of their commitments under the Armed Forces Covenant. In just a matter of months, local authorities across Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire have built partnerships, renewed their commitments under the Covenant and understood how the principles can be embedded into their organisations. This isn’t complicated, but it does require commitment, and I’d encourage all local authorities to read the report and implement the lessons that will help improve the support they give to their own Armed Forces Communities.”

Julie Robinson, project lead for the Charnwood, Melton and Rushcliffe Armed Forces Covenant Partnership, says:

 “We are very proud of the Charnwood, Melton and Rushcliffe partnership and through its work we have helped a number of organisations become more aware of issues relating to Armed Forces personnel and how they can support them.”

“We were delighted to share this learning with colleagues from other organisations and we are sure it will help them deliver better services to support serving and former Armed Forces personnel.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact James Gillies at james@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952 or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org

Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports

Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped

Twitter: @FiMTrust

Responding to the MOD’s announcement of increased support for Service Leavers Air Vice-Marshal Ray Lock CBE, Chief Executive at Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), says:

“The creation of the Defence Transition Service is a welcome step in the right direction. The enhanced support it offers the most vulnerable will have a big impact; but as a modest resource, it has to be targeted at those who need it most to be effective. The majority of people who leave the Armed Forces make a smooth transition to civilian life. But some do struggle, and they must be given the right support when they first need it.

“There is already much excellent work being done to support ex-Service personnel as they rejoin civilian life. The new Defence Transition Service will need to integrate with existing services provided by the public and charitable sectors. Service leavers, and in particular the most vulnerable, need to be identified early and signposted to the most appropriate services available.

“The 2016 FiMT-funded Stoll outreach programme in London demonstrated how those facing particular difficulties during transition, such as housing, employment and health issues, can be targeted to ensure they receive the best support possible (Report here). We are pleased to see that the Government is now developing a more holistic approach to the support that the Defence Transition Service promises to provide.”

“The Forces in Mind Trust has been promoting a holistic approach to transition since 2013 when it published its TMS Report, highlighting that ‘the whole family is transitioning, not just the Service leaver.”

“The MOD is stepping up its support for veterans’ transition to civilian life. The acid test though will be whether the Defence Holistic Transition Policy published today translates into practice, particularly on such key areas as the translation of military skills into the workplace, overcoming misperceptions of veterans, and sharing data”.

A statement from Chief Executive, Ray Lock, Forces in Mind Trust

In response to yesterday’s news regarding reserves held by Armed Forces charities, Ray Lock, Chief Executive at Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) states:

“To accuse Armed Forces charities of ‘hoarding’ cash is to ignore the context within which these (and many other) charities are operating, and the challenges of ensuring they successfully meet the needs of their 6 million potential beneficiaries, whilst also being sustainable both now and in the future.

“Charities’ free reserves represent just a few months of future running costs. Forces in Mind Trust’s research carried out in partnership with DSC (Directory of Social Change) shows that between 2012 and 2017, large Armed Forces charities typically held less than a year and a half’s expenditure in reserves and that small charities are less able to build reserves (Armed Forces Charities – Sector Trends 2019 Report).  This picture is further complicated by the balance between restricted and unrestricted funds.

“With an ever-increasing cost of meeting the needs of the changing demographic, reductions in public services, and pressures on fund raising across the sector, our research suggests that reserves in the Armed Forces charities sector are at an appropriate level for the current circumstances. We also know that individual charity boards look regularly and closely at their position.

“We expect to report again at the beginning of 2020 with an updated version of our independent and ground-breaking 2014 ‘Sector Insight’ report.”

ENDS

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust

Policy Statement on Employment

This Statement sets out FiMT’s policy position on the employment of ex-Service personnel and their families. It provides an overview of the evidence that exists to support it, the issues that inform it, and the changes that are needed to achieve it.

Click here to download FiMT’s Policy Statement on Employment.

VETERANS FACE NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES WHEN APPLYING FOR JOBS

Nearly one fifth (18%) of UK organizations surveyed are unlikely to consider hiring veterans due to negative perceptions of their time spent in the Armed Forces.

Veterans, or those who have served in the Armed Forces, face negative stereotypes when applying for jobs, according to a survey released today (8th October) by the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT). The new YouGov survey reveals nearly one fifth (18%) of UK senior decision makers with hiring responsibilities are unlikely to consider hiring veterans, mostly due to negative perceptions of their time spent in the Armed Forces.

Of the negative perceptions held by potential employers, the most common is that veterans do not have the relevant skills or experience (44%). This is followed by a belief that they may not fit the culture of the workplace (19%); skills from active duty may not translate into a business environment (18%); or they may have different levels of education from those expected of civilian workers (11%).

Over a quarter of the organisations polled in the research (27%) have never hired a veteran and 10% of organisations don’t believe taking advantage of the skillsets of veterans would bring value to their organisation. However, nearly two-thirds (63%) of employers polled in the survey believe hiring veterans helps contribute to the diversity of their organization. The smaller organizations polled in the survey ranked as the least likely to consider hiring a veteran (65%) whilst the larger organizations ranked as most likely (87%).

The Veteran Employment research was commissioned by FiMT, whose mission is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families to make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life. Over 1,000 senior decision makers were polled in the research, including private, public and third sector organizations of all sizes.

The research is part of FiMT’s core Employment Programme which aims to ensure that no ex-Service person, or their spouse or partner, is disadvantaged in achieving a successful employment outcome. The FiMT Employment Programme is focused on bringing about change in two areas:

• Ex-Service personnel having the right skills and understanding, receiving the right support and preparing appropriately.

• Employers understanding the skills and potential of Service leavers, and being able to access and harness the veteran workforce.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT says:

“The fact that many organizations would not consider hiring veterans due to negative perceptions of their time spent serving in the Armed Forces, highlights the misunderstanding that veterans are unskilled or unfit for business environments. Such misunderstandings are unfounded and damaging to veterans’ employment opportunities. Employers must ensure these unhelpful perceptions are addressed in their recruitment processes, so that they benefit from the skills that veterans can bring to their organization.”

“Veterans gain strong leadership, communications, management and STEM skills from their time spent serving in the Armed Forces. As the UK currently faces a STEM skills shortage, and the evolving world of work cries out for better leadership and collaboration, employers would do well to tap into veterans’ talent to the benefit of both veterans and UK organizations.”

“Our research demonstrates that Government must strengthen its strategy for translating and accrediting skills, experience and qualifications gained in the Armed Forces for the civilian world. We need to increase awareness and understanding among civilian employers of how Service leavers’ skills fit their recruitment needs. Together these will help the annual 14,000 Service leavers to find fulfilling employment, and the many UK businesses to improve their performance.”

Andrew Armes, UK Head of Talent Acquisition, Roche Products Ltd says:

“At Roche we believe that inclusivity is the key to our business success as it underpins innovation. Veterans have valuable skills that will help us with our future business needs and transformation as a business. By tackling any negative perceptions and attitudinal issues we can learn a lot. We are delighted to be partnering with Forces in Mind Trust to help address stereotypes and help unlock potential.”

During the first month of the Employment Programme, FiMT is partnering with Roche, the multinational healthcare company, to host a conference on 8th October challenging employers’ negative stereotypes of veterans. Following this, FiMT will host an event for senior politicians and business leaders to galvanise action.

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact James Gillies at james@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952 or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust
About the Mental Health Research Programme: www.fim-trust.org/mental-health/research-programme/

About the research:

All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 1282 adults who are senior decision makers with responsibility in HR in UK businesses. Fieldwork was undertaken between 5th – 18th September 2019. The survey was carried out online.

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Implementation of pilot mental fitness initiative to be evaluated

The implementation of a pilot mental fitness initiative, named HeadFIT, is to be evaluated over 12-months by King’s College London thanks to a grant of £92,757 awarded by the Forces in Mind Trust.

The initiative has been developed collaboratively by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and the Royal Foundation to promote awareness and management of good mental fitness within the Armed Forces Community and to prevent the onset of poor mental health.

The mental fitness initiative will be delivered via the mental health and well-being approach for Defence people and incorporated into annual and key career leadership training, supported by a video led campaign and website with self-help tools to aid in the understanding and awareness of mental fitness, and help personnel to maximise their potential.

The evaluation will consist of a series of questionnaires, interviews and focus groups with Defence people as well as with key stakeholders, to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the different elements of the initiative for military and Defence personnel. Results will be analysed to identify potential improvements to both the initiative and its implementation, prior to the full-scale roll-out across the Armed Forces.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive, Forces in Mind Trust, said: “The initiative developed by the MOD and The Royal Foundation is a progressive step in supporting the mental health of our Armed Forces. The evaluation of HeadFIT, funded by FiMT, will enable us to better understand what works in practice to support the mental well-being of our Service personnel during, and in the transition out of, service.”

Dr Sharon Stevelink, Lead Researcher, King’s College London, said: “We are looking forward to working with the MOD and The Royal Foundation to ensure that this initiative is independently evaluated. The aim of our evaluation is to help to improve the programme and ensure the initiative reaches its full potential. The study builds on our previous work evaluating health and well-being interventions in the Armed Forces and other trauma-exposed organisations. We are excited to be able to continue to help improve the mental fitness and readiness of military personnel throughout their military careers and beyond.”

Representative MOD, said: “The MOD has undertaken a comprehensive overhaul in our approach to mental health, beginning at the outset through promoting positive mental health and well-being, providing leadership support and reassurance regarding the effective treatment available.

We cannot do this alone, working with our partners outside of Defence is critical to getting this right. The importance of collaboration and partnerships with organisations such as FiMT, the Royal Foundation and King’s College London remain key to continuing our sustained focus on mental health and well-being ensuring that Life in the Services remains a rich and rewarding experience.”

David Wiseman, The Royal Foundation, Head of Programmes: Supporting Those Who Serve, said:

“This is an important programme; a legacy from the Heads Together Campaign that we hope will change the way Defence People think about mental health.  The focus of this work is the good management of good mental fitness – what should everyone be doing every day to proactively look after themselves and to unlock their potential instead of considering our mental health only when there is a problem.

The evaluation conducted by King’s College London will provide information that will enhance this work, and everyone is grateful that the Forces in Mind Trust are able to support this research.”

-Ends-

About King’s College London

King’s College London is one of the top 25 universities in the world (2017/18 QS World University Rankings) and among the oldest in England. King’s has more than 26,500 students (of whom nearly 10,400 are graduate students) from some 150 countries worldwide, and nearly 6,900 staff. The university is in the second phase of a £1 billion redevelopment programme which is transforming its estate. http://www.kcl.ac.uk

About Forces in Mind Trust
FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families to make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life. FiMT delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery, and by strengthening the Armed Forces charities sector through collaboration and leadership, and by building its capacity.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better-informed decisions can be made.

Useful links
Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust