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FiMT awards funds to Directory of Social Change for Focus On reports and continued running of armedforcescharities.org.uk

The Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has awarded the Directory of Social Change (DSC) a grant of £125,825 over one year for the continuation of the Armed Forces Charities project.

Since 2014, DSC has partnered with FiMT, Cobseo and wider stakeholders to deliver research on those charities which serve the Armed Forces community.  From the website www.armedforcescharities.org.uk, to a series of published reports, this partnership’s work continues to be the premier source of information on the UK’s Armed Forces charities.

The award will support the continued development of the Armed Forces Charities website, and the production of two Focus On reports on finance and families, to provide a comprehensive picture of the key topics of charitable support for the Armed Forces community.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT says:

“Generating an evidence base through which policymakers can more effectively direct legislation towards improving the lives of the ex-Service community and their families lies at the heart of what FiMT does.  To this end, we always welcome the opportunity to work with partners who produce as high a level of research as the Directory of Social Change.  We have undertaken significant amounts of work with them since 2014, producing independent and impactful research on the challenges faced by members of the ex-Service community.

We are also pleased to continue supporting the excellent resource that armedforcescharities.org.uk is, and all that it offers by way of information on the military charity sector.”

Debra Allcock Tyler, Chief Executive at the Directory of Social Change says:

So many charities in the UK do absolutely critical work for those who serve us all – the men and women in our forces, those who have returned to civilian life, and critically, their families too. This project helps to understand what those charities do, so we can ultimately make better policy decisions for the people they help. We’re absolutely thrilled to be able to continue working with our colleagues at FiMT to extend our evidence base on Armed Forces charities.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact Daniel J. Levy at co@fim-trust.org / 0207 811 8916.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org

Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/

Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/

Twitter: @FiMTrust

About the Directory of Social Change (DSC):

DSC has a vision of an independent voluntary sector at the heart of social change, and believe that the activities of independent charities, voluntary organisations and community groups are fundamental to achieve social change. DSC exists to help these organisations and the people who support them to achieve their goals.

With over 40 years of research experience in the charity sector, DSC understand the importance of insightful analysis and evidence-based knowledge to help direct social change. Since 2014, DSC has worked with the Forces in Mind Trust to provide research and analysis on armed forces charities, becoming the foremost provider of information in this field.

DSC is also the leading provider of training and information for the wider voluntary sector and publishes an extensive range of guides covering subjects such as fundraising, management, communication, finance and law.

Useful links:

Website: www.dsc.org.uk

Twitter: @DSC_Charity

Project website: www.armedforcescharities.org.uk

Project Twitter: @ForcesCharities

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FiMT awards funds to King’s Centre for Military Health Research, King’s College London for data linkage study on lifetime offending by UK military personnel

FiMT awards funds to King’s Centre for Military Health Research, King’s College London for data linkage study on lifetime offending by UK military personnel

Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) is delighted to announce that it has awarded a grant of £120,664.31 to King’s Centre for Military Health Research, King’s College London for a data linkage study on lifetime offending by UK military personnel.  The study will be conducted by Dr Jamie Kwan, Postdoctoral Researcher at the King’s Centre for Military Health Research alongside Professor Nicola Fear, Director of the King’s Centre for Military Health Research and Dr Deirdre MacManus, Reader at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London.

The goal of this project is to explore offending behaviour among UK military personnel prior to joining, during and after service, and it will be linking and combining three separate sets of data.  These data sets are the King’s Centre for Military Health Research’s cohort study, the Ministry of Justice’s Police National Computer (PNC) database of community offending records and the Ministry of Defence’s REDCAP database for in-service offending records.

Dr Kwan’s study will examine how offending behaviour changes as military personnel move through various stages in their career: from pre-service to during service, before and after deployment, and from service to post-service.  There will be a particular emphasis on whether military service impacts offending behaviour among personnel who have a history of pre-service offending compared to personnel who do not.

Ultimately, this project will aid the development of interventions to reduce offending among serving and ex-serving personnel.  This will likely need to be tailored to the British ex-Service community, as opposed to the general population or American ex-Service community.

Completion is expected in early-2022.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT says: “By supporting this study, we hope to better understand possible connections between military service, and pre and post-service offending.  Ultimately, this will allow for more effective early interventions with at risk members of the ex-Service community, and their better transition into civilian life.  This study utilises a broad set of data, and we welcome its evidence-driven approach to improving the lives of a sub-sector of the ex-Service community.”

Dr Jamie Kwan, Postdoctoral Researcher at the King’s Centre for Military Health Research says: “We are thrilled to receive this award and are excited to work with FiMT to examine lifetime offending behaviour patterns among serving and ex-serving personnel.  While previous research has examined offending behaviour using the Ministry of Justice’s PNC database and Ministry of Defence’s REDCAP database separately, we are eager to combine the datasets to give a complete record of offending behaviour.”

Professor Nicola Fear, Director of the King’s Centre for Military Health Research says: “While it has been established that certain types of violent and offending behaviour are prevalent among military populations, little is known about lifetime offending in this population.  This project will aid the identification of personnel who are most at risk of offending during and post-service.  This research will help in the development of interventions to reduce offending within this population.”

ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact Daniel J. Levy at co@fim-trust.org / 0207 811 8916.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links:

Website: www.fim-trust.org

Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/

Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/

Twitter: @FiMTrust

Useful links:

Website: www.dsc.org.uk

Twitter: @DSC_Charity

Project website: www.armedforcescharities.org.uk

Project Twitter: @ForcesCharities

GDPR

We work for charities, public bodies and health brands. We have obtained your contact details from Cision media database and use this information, as well as any other information you give us, in accordance with our Privacy Policy. We are contacting you today about our client, the Forces in Mind Trust. If you do not wish to be contacted by us, please let us know by replying to this email and we will delete your details from our records.

Forces in Mind Trust supports SSAFA’s Glasgow Helping Heroes Project

Forces in Mind Trust has pledged to donate over £110,000 to SSAFA, the Armed Forces charity to support an external evaluation of their Glasgow Helping Heroes initiative, in partnership with Glasgow City Council.  

SSAFA, the Armed Forces charity are delighted to announce that Forces in Mind Trust has awarded £112,074 to support an external evaluation of SSAFA’s Glasgow Helping Heroes initiative over the next 18 months.

The Glasgow Helping Heroes initiative, led by SSAFA and delivered in partnership with Glasgow City Council, is a ‘one stop shop’ for the Armed Forces community in the Glasgow area. The initiative was set up in 2010 and has provided support to over 2,000 veterans and their families in need so far.

The project provides advice and information on a range of issues including, housing and homelessness, to a population of around 50,000 veterans in Glasgow. In 2018, the project supported over 270 people, helping 21 to gain employment and 39 into secured tenancies. In 2019, the project supported over 310 people, helping 19 to gain employment and 42 into secured tenancies.

The evaluation will be led by Dr Steve Rolfe at the University of Stirling and will provide valuable insight for the military charity sector on this unique approach to supporting ex-service personnel and their families.

Sir Andrew Gregory, CEO at SSAFA, the Armed Forces charity said: “We are extremely grateful for this exceptionally generous contribution from Forces in Mind Trust to help support our Glasgow Helping Heroes Project, with Glasgow City Council. Working in partnership with leading academics in this field, this grant will help us to evaluate our work in Glasgow and our support for the Armed Forces community.

“The Glasgow Helping Heroes project is a brilliant example of the sector coming together to support those who need us most. The support provided by Forces in Mind Trust will enable us to independently evidence the impact that we are having through this service and the difference that we making to the lives of so many who need our support.”

Air Vice-Marshal Ray Lock, Chief Executive of Forces in Mind Trust, said: We are delighted to be supporting this project. Awarding grants to support evidence-based projects which lead to long-term solutions to the challenges faced by the Armed Forces Community lies at the very heart of FiMT’s mission and purpose. Together with SSAFA, our grant will allow for a thorough evaluation and assessment of Glasgow Helping Heroes project. This will highlight particular areas of success and opportunities for improvement similar service providers can draw upon across the UK.

“FiMT’s vision is that all ex-Service personnel and their families lead fulfilled civilian lives, and we seek to promote this through working on six particular outcomes. Two of these are employment and housing, and it is particularly pleasing to be able to support a project so focused on these areas.”

SSAFA, the Armed Forces charity, provides lifelong support to anyone who is currently serving or has ever served in the forces, and their families. This includes both regulars and reserves.

ENDS 

Notes to editors

About SSAFA:

SSAFA, the Armed Forces charity, has been providing lifelong support to our Forces and their families since 1885. Last year, our teams of volunteers and employees helped more than 82,000 people in need, from Second World War veterans to young men and women who have served in more recent conflicts, and their families. SSAFA understands that behind every uniform is a person. And we are here for that person – any time they need us, in any way they need us, for as long as they need us.

For more information visit www.ssafa.org.uk and follow us on Twitter: @SSAFA.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the then Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links

Website: www.fim-trust.org

Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/

Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/

Twitter: @FiMTrust

GDPR

We work for charities, public bodies and health brands. We have obtained your contact details from Cision media database and use this information, as well as any other information you give us, in accordance with our Privacy Policy. We are contacting you today about our client, Forces in Mind Trust. If you do not wish to be contacted by us, please let us know by replying to this email and we will delete your details from our records.

Research reveals the ‘invisible’ needs of veterans in custody, their families and children

New research from Barnardo’s provides a glimpse into the ‘invisible’ lives of the children and families of veterans in custody.

The charity was commissioned by the Forces in Mind Trust to assess their unique needs as part of a two year project.

This follows previous work by Barnardo’s supporting children affected by parental offending and highlighting the importance of maintaining family relationships.

The new report identifies complicating factors for veterans such as a loss of identity and a lack of holistic support services, and suggests early interventions, peer support and a family-based approach to prison work.

The findings and the recommendations will be shared at the official launch of the report in Birmingham on Monday 10 February which is due to be attended by police officers, charities and academics.

Barnardo’s researcher Leonie Harvey-Rolfe said: “Previous work has clearly demonstrated the importance of offenders maintaining family ties, and the impact of parental imprisonment on their children.

“This includes an increased risk of isolation, depression, bullying and truancy which can then affect their educational achievement and future prospects.

“However, the voices and experiences of children and families of veterans in custody have largely been absent – which is why this research is so vitally important.

“It is apparent that prisons, military charities and peer support groups often don’t collect information on dependants or family situations so this group is likely to remain invisible and their needs unmet.

“There is no doubt that more specialist support is needed.”

The research reveals that many former military personnel don’t identify as veterans because they think it only applies to those with long-service or active-service backgrounds.

Others fear revealing their past military careers could damage their relationship with their former units, or they view seeking support as an admission of weakness – which means many veterans don’t seek help for themselves and their family until they reach a crisis.

Shame also plays a role. One prisoner said: “I saw coming to prison as a failure so I didn’t say I was a military veteran because that’s a double-failure. I didn’t say anything for a long time.”

Key findings include:

  • Family breakdown levels are high amongst the sample and often this separation has occurred before the father went into custody
  • Mirroring the transition from military to civilian life, the greatest challenge is at the point of release from custody when transitioning back into the community
  • When veterans and families do access support on offer, feedback is largely positive

Key recommendations include:

  • Opportunities need to be developed to facilitate peer support for veterans, partners and children
  • Consistent and funded veteran support services should be in operation across all prison estates
  • One agency should take responsibility for overseeing and coordinating support for children of offenders before, during and after their parent is in custody

Leonie added: “No matter who their parents are or what they’ve done, the child is entirely innocent and should not be left to suffer in silence.

“What is needed is a change in systems and culture so that veterans, their partners and most importantly their children receive the right support at the right time.

“Only then can we truly start to improve the life chances of veterans and their families.”

Air Vice-Marshal Ray Lock CBE, Chief Executive of Forces in Mind Trust, said: “Until now, the impact on the children and families of Service personnel who are serving prison sentences has been poorly understood and under-researched. It is the role of charities such as ours and Barnardo’s to work to ensure that those who are most vulnerable are given the necessary support to rebuild their lives. This study provides much-needed data on the unique needs of an almost invisible group, and FiMT calls for whatever action is necessary for the research recommendations to be acted upon”.

For more information, visit www.nicco.org.uk.

-Ends-

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

About Barnardo’s:

In 2018/19 nearly 300,000 children, young people, parents and carers were supported by Barnardo’s.

We work to transform the lives of the UK’s most vulnerable children and every year we help thousands of families to build a better future. But we cannot do it without you.

Visit www.barnardos.org.uk to find out how you can get involved. Registered charity No. 216250 and SC037605

Follow Barnardo’s media team on Twitter @BarnardosNews

Forces in Mind Trust’s response to the Civil Service’s guaranteed interview initiative for ex-Service personnel

Responding to the Government’s announcement that veterans will be guaranteed interviews for some public sector jobs, Air Vice-Marshal Ray Lock CBE, Chief Executive at the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), says:

“The guaranteed interview initiative is a positive step forward to removing disadvantage. Negative stereotypes can prevent ex-Service personnel accessing the same employment opportunities as their civilian counterparts. Studies consistently show that organizations who do employ veterans are highly positive about the extra value they bring. So such misperceptions damage not only the individual, but also UK business.

“With this guaranteed interview initiative, the Civil Service is taking an important and valuable step towards providing equality of access to employment for ex-Service personnel whilst meeting the intent of the UK Armed Forces Covenant. The public sector is setting a good example that all, not just some, within the private sector, could follow.”

In October 2019, the Forces in Mind Trust published a Policy Statement on Employment which can be found here.

-Ends-

Note to Editor:  Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange an interview or if you have any queries, please contact Edward Haynes at Amazon PR (working on behalf of FIMT) at edward@amazonpr.co.uk or 0207 700 6952.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

GDPR

We work for charities, public bodies and health brands. We have obtained your contact details from Cision media database and use this information, as well as any other information you give us, in accordance with our Privacy Policy. We are contacting you today about our client, Forces in Mind Trust. If you do not wish to be contacted by us, please let us know by replying to this email and we will delete your details from our records.

Useful links

Website: www.fim-trust.org

Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/

Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/

Twitter: @FiMTrust