latest news

Request for expressions of interest

Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has issued a request for expressions of interest (REOI) to conduct research into the longer-term employment outcomes for ex-Service personnel.

The FiMT award is expected to be in the region of £200,000. Although there is no specific completion date, the Trust would like to see the report completed and published within 18 months of commencement.

The commission was a result of consultation with stakeholders which identified a lack of evidence on the longer-term employment outcomes for ex-Service personnel after the initial transition from the Armed Forces and whether these outcomes could be attributed to a person’s time in service or the support received during transition.

For more details and how to submit an expression of interest see the full REOI.

FEMALE VETERANS FACE MORE BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT THAN MALE VETERANS

New report calls for advice services to support women during transition to civilian employment.

According to a new report published today (25 September 2019), female veterans face a ‘double whammy’ of challenges when it comes to transitioning into employment once they have left the Armed Forces – those that are experienced by Service leavers in general, as well as those faced specifically by women.

The research carried out by Cranfield University and the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) examines the employment outcomes and experiences of female Service leavers as they transition into civilian paid employment. The report, commissioned by Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), looks at the reasons why women have a lower employment rate (69%) compared to men (81%), after leaving the Armed Forces*

The research, which included a review of existing data, interviews and a survey with stakeholders, employers and female Service leavers themselves, reveals:

  • Most women leave the Armed Forces voluntarily, most commonly for reasons related to work-life balance, job satisfaction, lack of opportunities, and family responsibilities.
  • One in four (22%) of the 154 women surveyed in the research were not employed, but the majority (68%) of those women wanted to be in work.
  • Employers want to recruit Service leavers with benefits perceived to include work ethic, motivation, resilience and loyalty.
  • However, Service leavers in general have difficulty translating their military skills and experience into the civilian world, with some employers also believing they lack commercial and market experience and find it hard to adjust to less structured environments.
  • Female Service leavers and employers interviewed in the report said that women, unlike their male counterparts, undervalue their experience and may deselect themselves from roles they are suitable for.

The report also includes recommendations for the Ministry of Defence and employers, and calls on the MOD to:

  • Provide increased flexibility in working practices and childcare.
  • Provide support and advice for women leaving the Armed Forces, including how to find employment that allows flexible working and in sectors not traditionally seen as avenues for Service leavers.
  • Promote the benefits of employing female Service leavers and supporting employers to do so.

Katie Watson served in the British Armed Forces for 10 years including tours in Bosnia and Northern Ireland, before leaving and entering employment as an NHS hospital chaplain in Newcastle. She says:

“I think that one of the toughest things for employers is understanding what women actually do in the Army and the skills we bring to our place of work. There is a misunderstanding that because we may not have all engaged in combat, we weren’t on the front line, playing a vital role in operations. We veterans are a unique breed. We’ve got a ton of assets but also have our idiosyncrasies. By listening to veterans within their organisations employers can better understand the brilliant skills and ethos we bring from the Armed Forces”.

Professor Emma Parry, the lead researcher at Cranfield University, says:

“Female Service leavers face a double whammy of obstacles when it comes to transitioning into civilian employment. Only a minority of the women we spoke to felt that they received enough support during transition, and some said that the support they did get was not properly tailored to their needs. We hope this study inspires a collective effort to improve their transition to civilian employment.”

Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT says:

“We know that female Service leavers face specific challenges when seeking employment. This report makes it clear where collaborative efforts between the Government and employers should be focused to overcome these challenges. More clarity on the transferability of military skills and the use of workplace mentoring are improvements which can be readily made. Bringing these recommendations to the attention of employers is no easy matter, but Forces in Mind Trust looks forward to working closely with the MOD and employers to achieve this aim”.

For more information about the research and a full copy of the report please visit https://www.fim-trust.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/20190920-Female-Service-Leavers-and-Employment-FINAL.pdf.

ENDS –

NOTES TO EDITORS:

For more information or to interview Ray Lock, Chief Executive at FiMT, please contact James Gillies, james@amazonpr.co.uk or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

Cranfield University media relations: Kath Middleditch, 01234 754594 / mediarelations@cranfield.ac.uk

About the research:

The research was carried out between January 2018 and February 2019 and had six stages: a review of existing evidence; analysis of secondary data; interviews with key stakeholders; a survey of female SLs (FSLs); interviews with FSLs; and interviews with actual and potential employers of FSLs.

*https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/676627/20180123_CTP_Bulletin_1516_REVISED_-_O.pdf

About Cranfield University:

Cranfield has been a world leader in management education and research for over 50 years, helping individuals and organisations learn and succeed by transforming knowledge into action. We are dedicated to creating responsible management thinking, improving business performance and inspiring the next generation of business leaders. We work to change the lives of our students and executives by encouraging innovation and creative thinking, as well as the drive to succeed and make a real impact on their organisations.

Organisations as diverse as Jaguar Land Rover, BAE Systems, Royal Dutch Shell, L’Oréal, UNICEF and the African Development Bank have benefited from our work, which ranges from management research projects, through staff talent management development on our MBA courses, to customised executive programmes.

Cranfield is one of an elite group of Schools worldwide to hold the triple accreditation of: AACSB International (the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), EQUIS (European Quality Improvement System) and AMBA (the Association of MBAs).

In the Times Higher Education/Wall Street Journal World University Rankings 2019, our Finance and Management MSc is ranked second in the UK, fourth in Europe and sixth in the world.

Our open and customised executive education programmes are ranked in the top ten in the UK, according to the latest Financial Times survey, and in the top ten in the world for international reach.

Over 8,000 people come to Cranfield each year to benefit from our executive and professional development programmes.Cranfield School of Management was the first business school in the UK to launch an Executive MBA via the newly created Apprenticeship Levy, run in partnership with Grant Thornton.

About the Institute for Employment Studies:

The Institute for Employment Studies (IES) is a leading independent, not-for-profit centre for research and evidence-based consultancy on employment, the labour market and HR policy and practice.

IES tweets from @EmploymtStudies

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):

FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.
The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.
FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better-informed decisions can be made.

Useful links
Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust

GDPR

We work for charities, public bodies and health brands. We have obtained your contact details from Cision media database and use this information, as well as any other information you give us, in accordance with our Privacy Policy. We are contacting you today about our client, Forces in Mind Trust. If you do not wish to be contacted by us, please let us know by replying to this email and we will delete your details from our records.

Forces in Mind Trust commits to supporting Experienced Leaders of the Armed Forces Community through Clore Social Leadership

Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has pledged support for six funded Specialist Fellowships on Clore Social Leadership’s 2020 Experienced Leader Programme. The one-year programme, starting in January, is open to individuals with six or more years’ experience as a social sector leader.

Building on the success and learning from five years of partnership with Clore Social Leadership, the FiMT Fellowships will promote leadership within and connections between the military and social sectors. The programme is aimed at those who have ambition to drive social change in their communities and organisations and have an interest in the Armed Forces Community.

Anna Wright, CEO of Naval Families Federation is an FiMT-funded Fellow, “I found [the Experienced Leader Programme] to be really inspiring and enjoyable. I met some wonderful people also in leadership roles but operating in different spheres to the military charity sector. It was fascinating and very informative to hear how things are done differently. My two deputies participated in [another Clore Social Leadership Programme]. I believe that we have all ‘grown’, as a result, to the benefit of our organisation. We are certainly more outward-looking and more collaborative with other organisations. I believe we are more ambitious in terms of setting goals that will benefit our beneficiaries.”

The programme helps build social leadership capabilities, confidence, effectiveness, self-awareness, resilience and overall impact through working with others. It comprises a number of activities including executive coaching, action learning and a secondment.

Shaks Ghosh CBE, Chief Executive of Clore Social Leadership, said: “We are delighted to announce our continued partnership with Forces in Mind Trust to support our 2020 Experienced Leader Programme. Through investing in the development of their leaders, the Armed Forces and Service Charities sector highlights the importance of like-minded organisations working together to address shared challenges. It is a pleasure to be partnering with such a forward thinking organisation, and we look forward to working with a new cohort of FiMT-supported leaders.”

Ray Lock CBE, Chief Executive of Forces in Mind Trust, said: “We are delighted to continue to support Clore Social Leadership’s Experienced Leader Programme. We have seen how the programme has continued to deliver excellent results which have benefited the Fellows, their respective organisations and most importantly, the people with whom they work, namely the Armed Forces Community. This is a unique funding model that enables the sub-sector to mutually support individual organisations to become collectively stronger. It’s another example of the collaboration between the Armed Forces charities which is at the forefront of civil society. By investing in the leaders of today, we are increasing the capability of the military and social sectors to make lasting change.”

Applications close on 18 November 2019. For more information and to apply, visit:
http://bit.ly/2UZ3yot

<ENDS>

Note to Editor: Ray Lock is available for interview.

About Clore Social Leadership
We support and develop social leaders so that they can transform their communities, organisations and the world around them. We help make social change happen by investing in people and enabling them to become resilient, connected and collaborative leaders with the right capabilities to tackle the social challenges of the 21st Century.

Our vision: A social sector led with skill, efficiency and ethical values
Our mission: To provide social leaders with appropriate, affordable and quality leadership development.

For more information, please visit www.cloresocialleadership.org.uk and join the conversation on Twitter @CloreSocial

For press enquiries please contact Nadia Alomar, Director of Marketing and External Relations: nadia@cloresocialleadership.org.uk / 07432 669 081

About Forces in Mind Trust
FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.

The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families to make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life. FiMT delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery, and by strengthening the Armed Forces charities sector through collaboration and leadership, and by building its capacity.

FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better-informed decisions can be made.

Useful links
Website: www.fim-trust.org
Reports: www.fim-trust.org/reports/
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust

Request for expressions of interest

Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) has issued a request for expressions of interest (REOI) to conduct research to understand the psychosocial determinants of psychological health and wellbeing for veterans’ families in the UK.

The FiMT award is expected to be in the region of £250,000. Although there is no specific completion date, the Trust would like to see the report completed and published within two years of commencement.

The commission was a result of previous research and consultation with stakeholders which identified a lack of evidence on the emotional and support needs of veterans’ families across the UK.

For more details and how to submit an expression of interest see the full REOI here.

UK MILITARY FAMILIES STRUGGLE TO ACCESS SPECIALIST DOMESTIC ABUSE SUPPORT

Report finds more communication is needed between Domestic Violence and Abuse support sector and the Armed Forces

A report released today by the University of Bristol finds less than 10% of Domestic Violence and Abuse (DVA) services identify themselves as providing specialist support to military families. The report titled “Domestic Violence and Abuse in Military Families: Improving Signposting to Specialist Support” was funded by the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) and finds a lack of communication between the civilian and military sectors is hampering efforts to support victims and perpetrators of DVA within military families.

The report recommends civilian DVA services and military welfare services continue efforts to work more closely together to increase awareness and understanding of the support available, and to recognise the complexities victims from UK military families face when seeking help. It finds many DVA services are unclear about the specific issues impacting military families experiencing DVA and why specialist support is needed.

Research findings show Armed Forces families see military based support as problematic, lacking in confidentiality and some still view seeking help as a sign of weakness.  The perceived negative impact on their partner’s career and losing entitlement to Service Family Accommodation were also reported as barriers to help-seeking.

The University of Bristol’s report highlights the need for national level communication to create a joined-up support network which strengthens and better coordinates the services available and provides training for practitioners on the unique challenges faced by military families.

To help facilitate collaboration, a National Conference will be held in Birmingham in March 2020 which will bring together stakeholders from across the military and civilian sectors. Conference partners include Forces in Mind Trust, The Royal British Legion, the MOD, University of Bristol, Birmingham City University, Women’s Aid England and Birmingham City Council.

Ray Lock, Chief Executive of the Forces in Mind Trust, said:

“As a direct result of this FiMT funded research, 34 DVA services were identified as providing specialist services for UK Armed Forces families and are now included within the government funded support database, Routes to Support. This will ensure that victims of DVA are signposted to specific services that offer the support they need.

It’s clear from the findings that more work needs to be done to ensure victims of domestic violence and abuse in the Armed Forces community are encouraged to seek the help they need. It is incumbent on the Armed Forces welfare service to help allay the fears that victims have in using their services, and create a culture of help-seeking without stigma or fear of reprisal.”

Dr Emma Williamson, the project lead at University of Bristol, said:

“This is an important project because it leaves a legacy through Routes to Support to update information about which specialist DVA services can best support military families experiencing DVA.  It also reiterates previous research, and the recent MoD DV Working Group Strategy (2018), that better communication across sectors can make a real difference in improving practice for families.  The conference in March 2020 is a fantastic opportunity for us to make that a reality by bringing the two sectors together to encourage local and national collaboration.”

An MOD spokesperson said:

“Domestic violence is inexcusable and we expect the highest standards of behaviour from our personnel, whether they are on or off duty. Last year we launched a strategy to help prevent domestic abuse in all its forms, including taking action in many of the areas identified in this report. We also work closely with agencies such as local authorities and the police to ensure those affected have access to the support they need.

The strategy aims to reduce the prevalence and impact of domestic abuse and increase the safety and wellbeing of all those affected. It is focused on increasing awareness of through training, establishing a more robust evidence base, and a review of associated policies.”

Read the full report here

END

NOTES TO EDITORS: Ray Lock is available for interview. To arrange please contact James Gillies at james@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952 or Ana Carvallo-Phillips, Ana@amazonpr.co.uk / 020 7700 6952.

About the research:
The research consisted of a limited literature review and primary data collection. The literature review was guided by identifying what constitutes a specialist DVA provision for military families, identifying and consolidating what differentiates the military context, and defining what is meant by DVA services and interventions for military families. A multi-method approach was used to collect primary data. This included: one focus group with victim/survivors; four face-to-face interviews and eight telephone interviews with practitioners; an online survey for service providers; observation of DVA meetings, five site visits across three case study sites; and email correspondence to reach all the relevant stakeholders.

About the Centre for Gender and Violence Research, University of Bristol:
The aim of the Centre for Gender and Violence Research is to conduct high quality research to inform policy, practice and action on gender-based violence. Its history of researching violence against women and gender-based violence, feeds into policy and practice nationally, internationally and locally.

About the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT):
FiMT came about from a partnership between the Big Lottery Fund (‘the Fund’), Cobseo (The Confederation of Service Charities) and other charities and organisations. FiMT continues the Fund’s long-standing legacy of support for veterans across the UK with an endowment of £35 million awarded in 2012. http://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/.
The mission of FiMT is to enable ex-Service personnel and their families make a successful and sustainable transition to civilian life, and it delivers this mission by generating an evidence base that influences and underpins policy making and service delivery.
FiMT awards grants (for both responsive and commissioned work) to support its change model around 6 outcomes in the following areas: Housing; Employment; Health and wellbeing; Finance; Criminal Justice System; and Relationships. All work is published in open access and hosted on the Forces in Mind Trust Research Centre’s Veterans and Families Research Hub. A high standard of reportage is demanded of all grant holders so as to provide a credible evidence base from which better informed decisions can be made.

Useful links
Report: www.fim-trust.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Bristol-Report.pdf
FiMT website: www.fim-trust.org
Who we have helped: www.fim-trust.org/who-we-have-helped/
Twitter: @FiMTrust

Only two percent of armed forces charities support veterans in the criminal justice system

New report calls for better identification of offenders to help charities direct their services to veterans in need, and their families.

New research published today (5 September 2019) by the Directory of Social Change, shows that just two percent of UK Armed Forces charities deliver support for veterans who have come into contact with the Criminal Justice System.

The report titled Focus On: Armed Forces Charities in the Criminal Justice System, funded by the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT) shows that just 31 of the UK’s 1,888 Armed Forces charities provide criminal justice related support to 3,200 veterans each year. This is significantly fewer than the number of Armed Forces charities providing support in other areas such as physical health where 121 charities provide support, education and employment (78), housing (78), and mental health (76). The evidence from the report also shows that the 3,200 veterans represent those accessing services, rather than those in need, which is a potentially far higher number.

The findings reveal that small cohorts of Armed Forces charities specialise in support at different stages of the Criminal Justice System, for example when veterans are in police custody, during their time in prison, and following their release. Notably, just eight charities help individuals in prison. The most common support that charities provide for those who have come into contact with the Criminal Justice System is for education and employment, delivered by just over half of the charities. The research also finds that around a fifth (39%) of Armed Forces charities provide support to family members of veterans who have been in the Criminal Justice System, with the most common being help with finances, debt support, education and employment and mental health.

The Focus On report highlights initiatives such as the Cobseo Veterans and Criminal Justice System Cluster and Project Nova as case studies of cross-sector collaboration which could be more widely adopted and emulated across the sector.

The report calls for greater partnerships between charities that support veterans in the Criminal Justice System and criminal justice support organisations, such as social services and Liaison and Diversion services. It also highlights the need to identify the number of ex-Service personnel in various stages of the Criminal Justice System in order to help charities better direct their services to these individuals and their families.

DSC Researcher and lead author of the report, Anthony Robson says:

‘Armed Forces charities play an important role in supporting veterans and their families who have come into contact with the Criminal Justice System. This report not only highlights the services provided to veterans across the different stages of the Criminal Justice System, but importantly calls for the need to better direct this provision of services by enhancing cross-sector collaboration between criminal justice support organisations and Forces charities’.

Air Vice-Marshal Ray Lock CBE, Chief Executive Forces in Mind Trust says:

‘For anyone claiming to hold dear the interests of the Armed Forces community, be they a politician, official, media or charity, the DSC’s Focus On series is a must read.  This report provides the evidence base and hence understanding of the Criminal Justice System, upon which all good policy decisions should be made.’

Chloe Mackay, Co-Chair of the Cobseo (Confederation of service charities) Veterans in the Criminal Justice System Cluster says:

‘Having the support of a charity that knows what they have been through and takes an interest in them can give veterans the strength they need to turn their lives around. I welcome this report, which provides insight into the delivery of support to veterans in the Criminal Justice System.’

Download the free report at www.armedforcescharities.org.uk/criminaljustice